Sign in to follow this  
Karen1960

Gardening

3 posts in this topic

As I already mentioned before, I do love to garden and since I am retired, I always eat from my own garden. Is that something you will allow in your subdivision? I think a community garden and aquaponics are amazing, and I do love to volunteer my time for that, but there is nothing as awesome as going outside your backyard door and getting the fresh herbs and veggies for your dinner salad.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was just on my lot in late September, walking the grounds with the project developers.  We walked through the plans my wife and I have in mind for the land, and altered them with their suggestions.  We are looking to make as much of the land as productive as possible.  We picked out over 50 fruit and nut trees, though we soon realized that we will need more than that.  Then we marked off about a quarter acre or so for a small organic vineyard.  Finally, we walked off about a 500 square foot plot for an initial garden for veggies and annual fruits.  We plan on doing a lot of canning for the winter months, so a lot of the garden will probably go towards that effort.

So, short answer - you can do what you want.  It's your land.  Hopefully there will be some general neighborhood guidelines that discourage eye sores like junk cars on the land, but other than that, it's dealers choice.  I looked at another property in the O'Higgins region where the land was micromanaged by the neighborhood and very restrictive.  It was an enormous turn off.  I wouldn't have made my purchase if I was being told what I can and can't do with it in terms of what I could plant.

Hope that helps...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Karen,
YES! In fact, we do encourage planting trees, vineyards, and gardens. We do not want to micromanage your property as some other developments might do, but we do want every owner to plant trees or vineyards. After all, this is a sustainable community.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Posts

    • Calvin, I think It is important to have an attorney that is on your side! When I was looking to buy investment property in Chile, I had my own attorney, someone to look out for my interest. I was searching to buy retirement property in the Lakes area, closer to Patagonia. Found an awesome deal, everything looked great and the price was right. Then my lawyer discovered that it was in dispute with the Indigenous people on that land. He said that if we would not have caught that, I might have lots of trouble down the road. I don’t know if that applies in the area where this community is, but I think it’s worth checking that out.
    • Hello Calvin, You have great reasons to be concerned. My advice is to start looking if the land someone is promoting does actually belong to them or if they do have the right to sell it. One should not blindly trust the seller's lawyer but should hire an own attorney in order to do all the due diligence.   In our case, the property is fully paid for and has no encumbrances, but do not take my word for it! Do your own investigation or have an attorney do it for you! 
    • Hello Calvin, welcome to the forum!
    • Hi, I am new to the forum and to this website. I am very curious about your subdivision but I am even more skeptical. I read about Galt's Gulch and other similar projects in Chile on the internet and as far as I know, many people lost a lot of money. What can you tell me about that? How do I know that this is not another scam?
    • Hello, my name is Calvin and I am from Waterloo, near Omaha, Nebraska.