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Rufina

What are the most important things to address in CCR's to protect everyone without unnecessary over regulation?

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While we are creating the Codes Covenants and Restrictions, we would love to hear your opinion on what you think is important to cover.

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I think that the most important thing for your structure is to come up with a solid set of rules or “laws” if you may, and there to be one individual or a very small group in charge. There will always be the “their dog killed our cat, what are you going to do about it” or the "they park on our lawn, are too noisy, smelly, put up that ugly thing in their lawn”” they get to eat too much of the meat" etc.

 Answer questions like. What is the local law? Does it rule over the community? Are there covenants? Where does one go for resolve and who is in authority, in charge? How will it be enforced? Will there be a community militia?

I have too often seen that the dream is wonderful, the land and structures beautiful but in fruition, the emotions rule over all and not handled quickly, firmly and justly, black clouds set in sometimes creating hurricanes.

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It is important to address the following things:

Transparency - I think it's good to let everyone know what is happening in the subdivision via email, newsletters, web, etc.

Non-aggressive enforcement - what I mean is if someone complains check it out and then act accordingly. Don't go around looking for violations when no complaint exists.

Allow realistic time frames to get fixes done.

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A properly run and managed HOA can be a very good thing, and a poorly managed HOA can be a disaster. Many problems arise when homeowners stop attending HOA meetings. Often good people from neighborhood sit home and do nothing and sore losers get on board of directors and start terrorizing everyone.

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I am a real estate agent and I have buyers that insist "No HOA", so we go and view homes in non-HOA subdivisions, and then they complain:
"I can't believe that someone would paint their house this ugly color!"
"I don't like to look at the huge boat parked in the neighbor's driveway!"
"Does everybody in this area here have a project car in their driveway?"
"Why do they have 2 tiny houses on wheels parked in their backyard? Is it a mobile home park?"

But after that, they still insist that they want to live in a subdivision where there is no HOA. People just love to hate the HOA, and yet, they can not live without.
Just keep the rules in the subdivision fair and people will benefit while still complaining about it.

Edited by agent404

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As a home owner, I would like to have access to the financial books. If money is handled in an improper way, the home owners have a chance to catch it early on and avoid big losses.
It always seems strange to me if the HOA is not willing to share what is going on financially.

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In the restrictions, I would like to see only major things addressed. I would not like to see the HOA govern over little, unimportant issues.

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I consider major issues to be things like :

Are mobile homes allowed?
Is vacation rental allowed?
How many structures are allowed on one lot?

And little, unimportant things are:

How many pets can I have?
The trampoline cover has to be black only!
Walking dogs before 7 am is prohibited!
What color flowers are allowed in the front yard?

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I agree! Also, I think what is very important that when owners want to implement something new, that they don't have to get all 100% of property owners to agree. I think it should be a majority like 75% of people, but not all. Sometimes a good change needs to be made, and only one or two owners can veto the whole process.

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Recently, we had several guests from Canada and USA visiting our property in Colchagua Valley. Officially, we did not start selling the lots yet; we want to get more things done, but some people are eager to see what is happening with our development. We also wanted to see what kind of reaction we will get from our first customers. Feedback is always essential for any business. So... we decided to set up the appointments.

We gave a tour of the property and every time during conversations with our visitors the subject of CCnR's would be brought up. Everyone seems to be concerned that if low-quality houses, which are common in Chile, are allowed, it might affect the property values. During phone conversations with other clients, we also discussed this issue.

I decided to write about this on the forum to let our readers know that we will address this issue in the CCnR's. Meanwhile, we would love to hear your opinion on that.

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This is so ridiculous! I hope you guys won't have rules like that!
I found this news today on 12WBOY. Here is what they reported on:

AUBURN, Calif. (WCMH) - Members of a California community are upset after their homeowners’ association told them they need to keep their garage doors open during the day.

A list left with homeowners in the Auburn Greens subdivision is giving many residents a cause for concern. It mandates leaving garage doors up from 8 am through 4 pm Monday through Friday, KTXL reported.

Residents who fail to keep their garage door up face a $200 fine and an administrative hearing.

“I have nothing to hide. I understand that somebody had someone living in the garage. I don’t,” said Shelly Ia. “I am following the rules. All I am asking is a reasonable way of going around this. If you want to do a monthly, bi-monthly inspection of my garage, I have nothing to hide. If I have something stored in there and you don’t like it, I’ll remove it.”

Ia says paying the fine may be worth avoiding a burglary.

“Let me give you the two hundred dollar fine right now. Give me a month so I can get my stuff out and I might as well clear everything out and leave the garage door open permanently because there is no point to having a garage door then,” said Ia.

A nine-year-old named Jason says he is concerned about his things that are stored in the garage.

“I don’t think it’s a good idea because they are going to steal my bike, I’ve got an electric scooter, an electric wheelchair. I’ve got all kinds of stuff. I just don’t think it`s very good to have it open,” said Jason.

The HOA did not return KTXL’s calls for comment. The HOA has a monthly meeting in two weeks. Many residents say they plan to be there.

 

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Oh, my! What an act of stupidity... I am sure that at the next meeting the rate of attendance will be much higher. I always saw this as the problem in subdivisions. People do not show up and then some fools take over and come up with silly rules.

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Must have a quiet hours policy in place. Some people will have their houses in the rental pool, and permanent residents do not want to regularly hear their neighbor’s loud music, parties, or screaming.  If someone does not follow the quiet hour's rules, there must be some punishment in the form of fines. That is going both directions; permanent residents must behave too.

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Good Idea Kyle. One reason I like my earth-sheltered passive solar home - it is very quiet. We live on 1.7 acres adjacent to a busy road and rarely hear any traffic except emergency vehicles sirens and Harley Davidsons. with six feet of dirt and concrete walls on three sides,  we love our quiet lives.  But I do agree noise is very irritating. and should be a concern. Thank you for bringing this up. I'll second that. Steve

 

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Good discussion. How do you keep the interest and value up without being an ogre?

For the buyer, if you put in a 250.000.000 clp house with amazing structures and beautiful landscaping and I come along and put in a 50.000.000 place and let the land stay wild, it's going to affect your property value. That can be a tough pill to swallow, both in terms of what you have to look at and if you want to sell. So how to manage that reasonably?

Are there restrictions on the plans for a house? Do they have to be approved? A minimum amount invested in a house?

As for things such as animals and pets, I don't see how that can be restricted. Maybe if the mud never goes away due to 50 cattle constantly walking in their own waste then there would be a real concern. But as long as proper higene is maintained and pets are kept within the property, who am I to say if someone has 1 cat or 50 dogs?

[NOTE: It's kinda weird replying two years later, but I'm late to the game. :) ]

Edited by Joe

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